Why Did it take a Sport Columnist to Say what a Preacher should be saying?

“Criticizing Jay-Zesus is a sin in the black community. He’s been approved by our President. Jay-Z’s wealth, to some, means he can do no wrong.” – Jason Whitlock

“Jay-Z’s success and his exalted status in the black community speak to the power of our self-hatred, delusional ignorance and unwillingness to learn from our history.

There’s always been a comfy bed, a pretty belly-warmer and a bright spotlight at the big house for the black performer willing to entertain the masses with n*gga tales.”  – Jason Whitlock

“Jay-Z is not slang for Jesus. Hova is no one’s savior…. He’s highly compensated to spin catchy fairy tales that promote the self-destructive notion that the path out of black American poverty and into the American Dream is through the drug trade and criminality.

Our political system — on the right and left — is so bankrupt of ethics that President Obama has zero shame about embracing the king of black-denigration music.” – Jason Whitlock

“Jay-Z is the holy grail of n*gga rap, the proper name for the genre of music that made Shawn Carter one of our president’s best friends. Oh, I’m sure that’s upsetting and disconcerting for some of you to read. You’d prefer I label the Jigga Man a gangsta rapper. He isn’t. He’s a n*gga rapper. Listen to his music.

On the opening track of “Magna Carta”, a song dominated by Timberlake’s singing, Jay-Z pops in just enough to rattle off “n*gga” eight times. He’s perfected the art form of repeatedly saying the N-word over slickly produced musical beats while telling stories about fame, fortune, family and a former life of crime.” – Jason Whitlock

People that curse themselves as a “term of endearment” and “entertainment” have no authority when they cry about “injustice…” This is not because its wrong to have a right opinion, but because consistency is powerful, and hypocrisy is weak. If you support it, you are it. – SOSpression

Bloody and Deceitful Men Shall Not Live Out Half Their Days

I know so many black men, including myself, that could not hardly even get loose to see and serve God until around 1996-1997, after Tupac & Biggie Died…

I wonder if anyone will have to die so that God can set this generation free?

To this day I remember the scripture my youth Pastor taught us when it happened:

Psalms 55:23
But thou, O God, shalt bring them down into the pit of destruction: bloody and deceitful men shall not live out half their days; but I will trust in thee.